Sujit Choudhry Breaks Down The Problems With Constitutional Democracies

Berkeley in California is the home of one of the most knowledgable professors in the field of constitutional law and general politics. His knowledge of the two subjects is exceptionally thorough, and he has studied the transition of constitutional law as it has evolved over time. The professor has also been blessed with many opportunities to study these phenomena in real-world situations. While he has published a fair number of articles discussing various subsets of these topics, his most recent piece details how modern constitutional democracies are in danger of falling apart.

Taking and Making a Point on a Current Issue

To make a larger point, Choudhry begins by discussing the investigation into whether or not the Russians influenced the 2016 presidential and whether or not the Trump campaign and administration had anything to do with the influence (releasefact.com). There were rumors that Trump was considering firing Robert Mueller, the head of the special counsel for the investigation, but experts agree that could spark a powder keg of constitutional problems.

This is more than a mere fault of the democratic process at its core. For those who understand how to deal with the issues that face modern governments, taking advantage of the democratic process isn’t very difficult. For instance, in 2015, the Polish government was populated with a majority of members from the nationalist right-wing party. This gave them the control they needed to make changes to the constitution of the nation, so they have used their time in power to try to change as much of the democratic infrastructure in Poland as they can to better suit their party. Technically, all of their actions have been ‘legal’.

To learn more of his published works, visit works.bepress.com

Choudhry points out that at one point in history, the only way to overthrow a system of government was by force. That is no longer case, however. Now, the best way to gain control of a government is to get voted in legally. At that point, all you have to do is skirt the line between doing what’s in the best interest of your party and your party alone and those actions that might be considered red lines or public focal points in their constitutionality.

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